PLATEAU STATE NIGERIA EROSION AND WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PROJECT (PLS-NEWMAP)

252
Advert

FEDERAL REPUBLIC OF NIGERIA

PLATEAU STATE GOVERNMENT 

PLATEAU STATE NIGERIA EROSION AND WATERSHED MANAGEMENT PROJECT (PLS-NEWMAP)

AdvertisementAdvert

Project ID: 51050; PLSNEWMAP/CQS 

REQUEST FOR EXPRESSION OF INTEREST (EOI) FOR SITE SPECIFIC CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT PLANNING OF PLATEAU CLUB-BINGHAM UNIVERSITY, MUNCHOGOPYENG, MANGU MARKET GULLY EROSION SITES, YAKUBU GOWON AND LANGTANG – NORTH DAM SITES OF PLATEU STATE NEWMAP 

Issuance Date: Friday, 24thMay, 2019

INTRODUCTION 

The Nigeria Erosion and Watershed Management Project (NEWMAP) is designed to support the country’s transformation agenda to achieve greater environmental and economic security. The NEWMAP Project Development Objective is to: reduce vulnerability to soil erosion in targeted sub-watersheds. 

The project’s strategic approach is to: i) start with “damage control” to slow the expansion of a targeted set of existing aggressive gullies, thereby reducing the loss to property and infrastructure and helping cultivate community ownership; ii) leverage the gully intervention to support integrated watershed management and move towards greater adoption of sustainable land and water management practices by local people in the sub-watershed where the gully is located; iii) improve or protect rural livelihoods in the sub-watershed and carefully implement local Resettlement Action Plans; iv) strengthen disaster risk reduction and preparedness at state, local, and community levels, v) underpin these efforts by strengthening relevant institutions and information services, including urban storm water drainage management planning, planning for plateau state gully erosion sites and dam sites, building a better knowledge base, and contributing to improved governance such as through better contract management, reporting transparency, open data, and beneficiary verification. 

The project will address severe gully erosion and dam problems in the short term, reduce vulnerability to soil erosion and climate variability in the medium term, and promote long-term climate resilient and low carbon development. NEWMAP will take an integrated watershed management approach to erosion that will address the interlink challenges of poverty, ecosystem services, climate change, disaster risk-management, biodiversity, institutional capacity and governance. 

OBJECTIVE OF CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT UNDER PLSNEWMAP 

In line with the realization of the overall goal of NEWMAP, integrated catchment management approach is apt for adoption and is guided by, but not limited to the following broad objectives:

  1. Protect project investments in major gully/dam rehabilitation and other relevant infrastructure on site;
  2. Prevent the formation of new gullies/dams and other land degradation beyond the immediate gully/dam site(s) in project catchments;
  3. Ensure and integrated approach with livelihood development, community participation and ownership of the project for sustainability; and
  4. Encourage the harmonization of plans and interventions through greater coordination between multi-sectoral institutions. 

JUSTIFICATION FOR CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT PLANNING IN EROSION/DAM AND FLOOD CONTROL SITES UNDER PLSNEWMAP Integrated catchment management under NEWMAP in gully/dam-prone areas uses participatory approaches to address matters of concern causing severe land degradation, including: 

  • Managing high surface water run-off that is the major cause of gully formation, especially in areas with fragile and heterogeneous landscapes at high risk of degradation. 
  • Poor waste management practices that can contribute to clogging of drains, flooding and land degradation.
  • Inappropriate land use contributing to sedimentation, flooding and land degradation.
  • High poverty rates, especially among women and vulnerable groups; and
  • Adverse impact of climate change on the environment. 

In addition, catchment planning, in consonance with civil works will, to a large extent address tractable and conflicting issues that usually arise in the field, which revolve around livelihoods, environmental safeguards and bioremediation. An effective planning process will also account for communal land ownership, equity and gender issues. Finally, community engagement and ownership of intervention investments will be important to ensure higher chances of post-project sustainability. 

For instance, persons along gully/dam corridors affected by the project, and the vulnerable and active poor, will be carefully identified and allocated into Community Interest Groups (CIGs) as primary beneficiaries in a manageable number whose project impact will be feasible and easily evaluated upon implementation. Thus, the burden of misdirecting resources to non-deserving community members not qualified for the scheme is reduced. One critical factor to be considered in catchment planning is the zoning of human activities, to checkmate nuisance effect at one point (i.e. avoiding linkages of negative environmental pollution among the upper middle and lower sub-catchments). A careful enlightenment of community members will yield informed decisions on “what type of livelihoods activities should be allowed “where, why and to whom”, all within the prism glass of spatial organization, environmental safeguards and sustainability. 

 From a technical perspective, catchment planning will clearly spell out how to blend civil works and low-cost vegetative measures such as bio-remediation to support long-term restoration of the catchment around the immediate gully/dam site, and also throughout the delineated catchment. The planned and proposed interventions beyond the gully site will cover upper, middle and lower areas of the catchment. By assessing needs through the designated catchment, linkages from the upper ridge of the catchment to lower elevation areas will be considered, especially for hydrological aspects. 

There is an urgent need to produce high quality, best-practice catchment plans for selected gully/dam sites to facilitate NEWMAP project objectives. To actualize this need, experts should be engaged to drive the planning process while field SFNGO staff facilitate engagement with community members and groups. 

UNDERSTANDING CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT 

Catchment management is a process of implementing land-use and water management practices to protect and improve the quality of water and other natural resources within a watershed by managing the use of of those natural resources. Catchment management is a flexible framework for managing water resource quality and quantity within specified drainage areas. most broadly, it is a general process that involves planning, implementation of plan and monitoring. The importance of meaningful stakeholder participating cannot be overemphasized as a contribution to the success of catchment management. Finally, catchment management must be supported by sound science and appropriate technology, especially remote sensing and technology such as Geographic Information Systems (GIS) for catchment assessment, planning, and monitoring. An effective catchment planning process uses a series of cooperative, iterative steps to:

  • Build partnerships with stakeholders;
  • Characterize existing environmental and socio-economic conditions in the selected catchment at appropriate scales;
  • Identify and prioritize environmental problems that need to be addressed;
  • Define realistic and necessary management objectives;
  • Develop an implementation plan with actions and interventions that will achieve the management objectives;
  • Implement and adapt selected actions or interventions based on available budgets; and
  • Monitor implementation progress, achievement of targets, and broader impacts of the plan-based interventions. 

METHODOLOGY/APPROACH TO CATCHMENT MANAGEMENT PLANNING

The general approach to catchment management planning in NEWMAP is based on global best-practices from different regions. The usual process involves a series of steps including:

  1. Build Partnerships
  2. Identify key stakeholders;
  3. Meet the stakeholders to discuss the concept of integrated catchment management, why it is important, the general planning process, integration with livelihood development, monitoring and evaluation, etc.;
  4. Identify and discuss stakeholder concerns;
  5. Set preliminary objectives for a catchment management plan;
  6. Build required local institutions and begin capacity building for catchment management and livelihood development;
  7. Conduct necessary outreach. 
  • Characterize the catchment
  • Delineate the catchment around the designated gully/dam site using topographic maps, Digital Terrain Mapping, etc.;
  • Gather required geospatial and field data, and develop a data base (and baseline) for the selected catchment;
  • Identify data gaps and collect additional data as needed;
  • Analyze the data to identify major issues such catchment degradation; and
  • Undertake ground-truthing as necessary. 
  • Finalize goals and identify solutions
  • Engage with local stakeholders to agree on priority issues to protect the gully/dam rehabilitation investments as well as issues beyond the immediate gully/dam rehabilitation work;
  • Agree on overall catchment planning goals to address critical issues;
  • Identify key actions and interventions and site-specific locations, blending stakeholder desires with technical guidance based on sound science. Actions and interventions will include small-scale physical work as needed and low-cost vegetative measures such as bio-remediation that can be implemented by community groups;
  • Verify locations for selection treatments with community members using site visits; and
  • Integrate livelihoods development into specific management goals.
  • Develop a catchment implementation plan
  • Draft a plan document based on an agreed template. It will include:
  • Background information on the catchment characteristics, issues, and opportunities;
  • A schedule /timeline for interventions in the plan and livelihood development;
  • Costed catchment management and livelihood interventions in order of priority;
  • Monitoring indicators for specific interventions and livelihood activities;
  • Schedule for ongoing community outreach program;
  • Appropriate maps and images to show the delineation of the catchment, key thematic characteristics, and agreed locations for specific interventions; and
  • Adherence to World Bank social and environmental safeguards.
  • Having a plan signed off by community representatives and approved by the appropriate government body. 
  • Implement the catchment plan
  • Work with communities to implement interventions identified in the catchment plan;
  • Undertake necessary monitoring;
  • Carry out agreed outreach and education/awareness activities. 
  • Monitoring and evaluation
  • Measure results against agreed indicators and the monitoring plan;
  • Report on the results as per the agreed schedule (monthly);
  • Adjust implementation as needed based on monitoring reports. 

SCOPE OF CONSULTANCY

The consultancy shall focus completing steps 1 to 4 from the preceeding section with the final output being a draft catchment management plan for the designated catchment. As such, the consultancy team will engage with communities, NEWMAP State Project Management Units (SPMUs), and local fields SFNGOs as necessary. The consultants will be guided by the SPMU Natural Resources Management Officer (NRMO) and work in collaboration with other SPMU experts, and the Federal Natural Resources Management Specialist. 

QUALIFICATION OF EXPERTS

The multi-disciplinary nature of integrated catchment management required that the work must be undertaken by a diverse team with expertise and advanced degrees in related fields including, but not limited to:

  • Natural Resource and/or Watershed Management
  • Hydrology and/or Water Resources Management
  • GIS/Remote Sensing
  • Geomorphology
  • Environmental Sciences
  • Forestry
  • Agriculture
  • Climate Change Expert
  • Social Sciences and Community Based Development

The minimum experience of team members should be (5) years with a minimum specific experience of (3) years on planning related to Catchment Management, Infrastructural Development, Water Resource Protection, Soil and Water Conservation, etc. the consultants must be experienced in developing operational action plans for tackling environmental problems in a scientific way. The consultants must also have a working knowledge of World Bank operational safeguards policies in the preparation and implementation of Safeguard Instruments relative to proposed catchment management and livelihood interventions. 

JOB DURATION

The duration for delivering on this assignment shall not exceed three (3) months from the date of award of the contract.

SUBMISSION OF EXPRESSION OF INTEREST (EOIs)

Expression of Interest must be delivered in a written form to the address below (in person) by: Tuesday, 11thJune, 2019 (Closing Date).

State Project Coordinator,

Plateau State NEWMAP Office,

No.17, Apollo Crescent, GRA Jos,

Plateau State, Nigeria

E-mail: [email protected]

Telephone: +2348067761908, +2348036154305 

SOURCE: DAILY TRUST

Advert